Students Staff

People pages

28 June 2019

Reaching out to young people this summer

Filed under: Campus news, Latest news, People pages, Student experience, What's on — Communications, CER @ 1:51 pm

Two summer schools will invite young people to our campus this summer to learn about and experience university life.

Over the next two weeks, the Outreach team will be welcoming around 150 students onto our Colchester Campus for a university residential experience that they will never forget.

Our summer schools are designed for students who come from backgrounds that are underrepresented in higher education and are the perfect opportunity for them to discover more about university. They raise aspirations, knowledge and attainment through an innovative set of activities.

Two summer schools will give students the opportunity to immerse themselves into university life, both academically through taster sessions and socially as they will be staying in our University accommodation.

Our year 10 summer school, funded through Make Happen – the Essex partnership for the National Collaborative Outreach Program-  will see students taking part in a one-night residential, working with University of Essex academics to produce an academic poster arguing passionately for or against one of the following topics:

Year 12 visitors will experience the five-day programme filled with lectures, seminars, and independent research time to prepare them for university applications and degree-level academic writing. As part of the application process, students were invited to write a  500-word application on one of the following strands:

  • Mental Health Uncut: Critically consider the role of social media in the development of mental health problems.
  • Detention in the USA: Trump has detained many asylum seeking families, do you think this affects people’s Human Rights?
  • Global Meltdown: Young people in the UK are not affected by worldwide environmental concerns. Discuss.
  • Biological Sciences: A life for a life: Is the use of embryonic stem cells in medical research justified? Argue passionately for and against.
  • Business Studies: Write about somebody in business you admire: Tell us why you think they make a good business person. Think about their professional image, behaviour and reputation.
  • Literature, Film and Theatre Studies: Delve into the fascinating world of relationships by immersing yourself in one of our key texts. Critically analyse how relationships are depicted in your text by writing an essay. Or, you may feel inspired to write a poem, song, rap, short story, piece of drama, epilogue or prologue.

Both year groups will be living in our on campus accommodation, using the academic and social facilities and experiencing life as a University of Essex student. Current students act as role models throughout the summer school to share their experiences and inspire them to follow their footsteps into university.

Summer schools are part of the University’s outreach program of activity which is designed to work with underrepresented groups in higher education and give them to tools and confidence needed to progress to Higher Education. More information about the University’s outreach activities can be found on our outreach website.

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7 June 2019

Welcoming three new members to University Council

Filed under: Latest news, People pages — Communications, CER @ 11:16 am

We are delighted to announce three new members of our University Council.

The University of Essex Council is our executive governing body comprising 25 members, the majority of whom are external. Council is responsible for the management and administration of our revenue and property.

 

Melanie Leech

Melanie Leech CBE, Chief Executive, British Property Federation

Melanie was appointed as Chief Executive to the British Property Federation in January 2015. She is also a trustee of the property industry charity LandAid and prior to this she was director general of the Food and Drink Federation. During her early career, she served as a  police constable for the Metropolitan Police Service, then joined HM Customs and Excise as a civil servant in 1988, going on to hold a number of senior civil service roles, in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, the Office of the Rail Regulator, and the Cabinet Office.  In 2015, Melanie was awarded a CBE for services to the food and drink industry.

Stephanie Hilborne OBE, Chief Executive of The Wildlife Trusts

Stephanie has just been announced as the new Chief Executive of Women in Sport, a role she will take up in October 2019.  She was previously Chief Executive of The Wildlife Trusts, a role she took up in 2004. She has championed nature’s recovery on land and at sea through improvements to legislation and by building corporate partnerships. Before her role with the Wildlife Trusts Stephanie was Chief Executive of Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust and Wildlife and Countryside Link as well as holding non-executive positions including with the UK Green Building Council. She has served on three key Defra commissions and in 2010 received an OBE for services to nature conservation.

Kathryn Harrison-Thomas MD, Global Business Partner CIB, Regional Business Partner Americas, Asia Pacific and UK&I, Corporate Services, Deutsche Bank

Kathryn is a proactive, dynamic senior real estate and strategy professional with more than 25 years’ international experience within a variety of industry and financial services sectors. In her time at Deutsche Bank she has held a number of roles from Global Head of Organisational Development to Global Head of the Product Transformation Programme. In her current role she manages a team of 10 Business Partners, manages a multi-million pound budget, is responsible for global relationship management, is the global product-lead for corporate services; develops and manages the client management vision and strategy to meet business goals and client needs and is a member of the bank’s CSR Global Committee. Kathryn is also a champion of diversity and is Board

Stephanie Hilborne

Member for the UK Chapter of Corporate Real Estate Women’s Network.

Vice-Chancellor, Professor Anthony Forster, said:

“I am delighted to welcome all of our new members to the University Council. With their wide range of expertise and knowledge, Melanie, Stephanie and Kathryn will offer invaluable experience in supporting the work of Council and ensuring our University is well governed and focused on delivering our new University Strategy 2019-25.”

Judith Judd, Chair of Council, added:

“Our new Council appointments will bring an excellent new dimension to our University. Council plays an absolutely vital role and their experience and talents will offer us invaluable insight and direction.”

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30 May 2019

Routes for reporting an incident

Filed under: Campus news, Latest news, People pages, Student experience — Communications, CER @ 11:49 am

We want to make it as easy as possible for any member of our community to report an incident. We have a number of routes for reporting, and we encourage anyone with a concern to consider making a report.

  • We launched our Report and Support system to make it as easy as possible for anyone, including visitors, to report an incident. The system is available on our website and reports can be made anonymously if preferred.
  • Our Student Conduct Office can receive and deal with complaints and full contact details are on our website. Our Code of Student Conduct is built on the principle that all students are expected to maintain a standard of conduct which supports the University’s commitment to excellence, promotes good order and the good name of our University. In accepting an offer of a place at Essex, every student is bound by our rules and regulations – including those in the Code of Student Conduct.
  • Our Human Resources section deals with formal complaints made by staff or students – about our staff. Our People Supporting Strategy seeks to ensure we have a diverse workforce in a safe, discrimination/harassment-free environment.
  • Our Security team provide 24/7 cover to our campuses and deal with complaints and incidents reported from across our University. All of our emergency contact details are on our website.
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22 May 2019

Celebrating Professor Jules Pretty’s time as Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Filed under: Latest news, People pages, What's on — Communications, CER @ 3:52 pm

Please join us on Wednesday 12 June to celebrate Professor Jules Pretty’s contribution to the University, as he steps down from his role as Deputy Vice-Chancellor.

Professor Jules Pretty is standing down as our Deputy Vice-Chancellor.

Professor Jules Pretty has played a vital role in our University for many years. He is Professor of Environment and Society, was Head of the Department of Biological Sciences from 2004-2008, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Science & Engineering) from 2010-2012, then Deputy Vice-Chancellor from 2012-2019.

Jules joined Essex’s Department of Biological Sciences in 1997, having worked for ten years at the International Institute for Environment and Development, where he was director of their sustainable agriculture programme from 1989. Before that, he worked at Imperial College.

At Essex, he set up the Centre for Environment and Society, which links across a variety of departments and disciplines. His sole-authored books include The East Country (Cornell Univ Press, 2017), The Edge of Extinction (Cornell University Press, 2014), This Luminous Coast (2011, 2014), The Earth Only Endures (2007), Agri-Culture (2002), The Living Land (1998), and Regenerating Agriculture (1995).

Professor Pretty is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology and the Royal Society of Arts, Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, former Deputy-Chair of the governments Advisory Committee on Releases to the Environment, and has served on advisory committees for BBSRC and the Royal Society.

He was presenter of the 1999 BBC Radio 4 series Ploughing Eden, a contributor and writer for the 2001 BBC TV Correspondent programme The Magic Bean, and a panellist in 2007 for Radio 4’s The Moral Maze.

He was appointed A D White Professor-at-Large by Cornell University from 2001, and is Chief & Founding Editor of the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability.

He received an OBE in 2006 for services to sustainable agriculture, and an honorary degree from Ohio State University in 2009.

A drinks reception will be held on Wednesday 12 June in The Hexagon from 4.45pm-6.00pm.  If you would like to attend Jules’ event, please RSVP to events@essex.ac.uk or if you would like further details please telephone Holly Ward on ext 3270 or email hollyb@esssex.ac.uk.

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16 May 2019

Our pledge to tackle inequality

Filed under: Latest news, People pages — Communications, CER @ 4:44 pm

We are a University committed to equality. As part of our drive in this area we have redoubled our efforts; signing the UUK NUS Bame attainment pledge – and beginning new work on Advance HE’s Race Equality Charter.

Dr Mark Frost, Head of our Department of History, is working closely with Karen Bush, our Head of Equality, Diversity and Inclusion on both of these important areas of work.

Mark said: “As a University we are committed to improving the representation, progression and success of minority ethnic staff and students so it was an easy decision for us to sign up to the UUK-NUS BAME attainment pledge.

We are just about to start focused work on Advance HE’s Race Equality Charter and, as Co-Chair of the Self-Assessment Team who will be leading on this, I am looking forward to working with staff and students from across the University to break down institutional barriers to entry and attainment. There are some difficult conversations about race and racism to be had but we are determined to tackle this problem.”

A new dedicated webpage has been set up and will be updated as our work progresses. Take a look now to find out more, including the five guiding principles underpinning the Race Equality Charter.

Look out for our new Race Equality Charter survey – coming soon.

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1 February 2019

Time to Talk Day – Thursday 7 February

Filed under: People pages, What's on — Communications, CER @ 3:33 pm

How are you?

Many of us will answer ‘fine’, even when we’re not.

Time to Talk Day is Thursday 7 February.

Too often, mental health problems are treated as a taboo subject- something not to be talked about.

However, mental health affects us all and we should feel able to talk about it. There are lots of different ways to have a conversation about mental health. And you don’t have to be an expert to talk.

In November 2018 the University signed the Time to Change Pledge, a commitment to you all to change how we think and act about mental health at every level of this organisation.

One in four of us will experience a mental health problem and nine in 10 say they have faced negative treatment from others as a result. By choosing to be open about mental health, we are all part of a movement that’s changing the conversation around mental health and ensuring that no one is made to feel isolated or alone for having a mental health problem.

As part of our ongoing commitment to this, we are supporting Time to Talk Day, taking place on Thursday 7 February.

This is a day when everyone is encouraged to have a conversation about mental health and we shall be promoting this in our restaurants and public areas.

We want everyone who works or studies here to feel they can be open about their mental health, and ask for support if they need it. We have a range of support services available to staff and for our students.

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27 July 2018

Social Interaction and Well-Being: The Surprising Power of Weak Ties.

Filed under: Latest news, People pages, Research impact — Communications, CER @ 11:23 am

“Human felicity is produced not so much by great pieces of good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that occur every day.”  Benjamin Franklin.

Gillian Sandstrom 200x300

Dr Gillian Sandstrom

In her fascinating study “Social Interaction and Well-Being: The Surprising Power of Weak Ties.” Dr Gillian Sandstrom found that even brief everyday social interactions, from a quick chat with your barista to saying hello to someone you pass by everyday – can have surprising effects on our happiness and wellbeing. Here she tells us more about her work and how we can all benefit from “weak ties”.

  • Can you tell us about your study and its findings – in a nut shell?

I did a postgraduate degree in Psychology after having spent 10 years in the workforce as a computer programmer. I had a strong case of imposter syndrome when I first arrived on campus, since I was 10 years older than the other students, and I didn’t have the same background training that they did (my undergraduate degree was in computer science, and I had only taken three psychology modules). There was quite a distance between the research lab and my supervisor’s office, and that walk took me past a hot dog stand. Somehow I developed a “relationship” with the lady who worked at the hot dog stand; I would smile at her and say hi whenever I walked past. I realized that this always made me feel a bit better, like I belonged on campus. I ended up studying this phenomenon for my PhD.

I asked people to keep track of all of their social interactions – any time they said hi to someone that they recognized (i.e., anyone except a complete stranger) – for six days. They carried around two small tally counters, and clicked one every time they interacted with a strong tie (i.e., a close friend or family member), and another one every time they interacted with a weak tie (i.e., an acquaintance). I found that people who had, on average, more daily interactions with weak ties than other people were, on average, a little bit happier. Also, on days when people had more interactions with weak ties than they usually did, they tended to be a bit happier than they usually were.

I’ve been at Essex for two years now, and almost every time I walk across campus now, I see someone I know. It makes me feel at home here.

  • What can staff do to build these weak ties with students?

Just say hi! I ran a study last year in my statistics module. The students break into three groups for their computer lab sessions, and I did something different for each group. For one group, I stood at the door and greeted students as they arrived. Another group wrote their names on name boards, which were displayed on their desks. The third was a control group, which received no greeting and no nameboards. Students in both of the experimental groups reported higher interest/enjoyment than students in the control group. This is something simple, that any instructor can do. Just make sure it’s genuine; if the students think your heart isn’t in it, it probably won’t be effective.

It’s not just academic staff that can build these connections with students. During my PhD, I stood on the pavement outside of Starbucks, and bribed people to help with my research, by giving them Starbucks cards, which they had to use right away to buy a coffee. I asked some people to be as efficient as possible: have their money ready and avoid unnecessary conversation. I told them that this would be helpful to the barista, who just wants to get through their shift. I asked other people to have a genuine social interaction: smile, make contact, and have a brief conversation. When people emerged from the store with their coffee, I asked them to fill out a brief survey. I found that people who had a minimal social interaction were in a better mood, enjoyed their Starbucks experience more, and felt more connected to other people. This means everyone can make a difference, whether you’re in food services, cleaning services, security, or anything else.

  • How do the students react?

When I greet my students outside of the classroom, at the beginning of the year they seem kind of embarrassed – sometimes they giggle, or look away, as if they can’t quite believe it. But they get used to it, and seem to enjoy saying hi back.  When I did my greeting/name board study, I asked students whether they had ever talked to me, whether I would recognize them if I saw them on campus, and whether I knew their name. Two students who were filling in the survey came up to me and straight out asked me if I knew their names. One of them literally jumped up and down and seemed quite delighted when I told her that I knew her name.

Since arriving at Essex, I’ve run a study at the Tate Modern art gallery, which is similar to, but the reverse of the one I did at Starbucks. I trained volunteers to approach gallery visitors and start a conversation about a particular exhibit in the Turbine Hall. The volunteers were a bit nervous about it – they usually wait for visitors to approach them, and didn’t want to intrude. However, when we surveyed visitors, those who had been spoken to by a volunteer (vs. those who hadn’t talked to a volunteer) were in a better mood, and felt more connected to the exhibit and to other people. This suggests that both the person initiating the conversation (as in the Starbucks study), and also the person being talked to (as in the Tate study), enjoy these kinds of interactions.

  • What challenges are there to developing these kinds of relationships with students?

Some people are bad at remembering names (because it’s really hard!), and others are bad at remembering faces. In some departments, we do team teaching; we only see a group of students for a few weeks, then someone else takes over. Not to mention that class sizes can be really large, and we have hundreds of new students every year. The whole idea of learning names can seem hopeless, and even pointless. The students do seem to really appreciate it, and I personally think all academic staff should know at least a handful of students by name, but I’m really happy that my research suggests that there are benefits to simply greeting students. Anyone can do that!

  • What are the benefits to weak ties – apart from wellbeing? Are there any downsides?

Besides making both parties feel good, weak ties can provide a sense of belonging. For her capstone project, one of my undergraduate students ran a survey assessing students’ campus involvement, use of support services, and social relationships, and how these were related to interest/enjoyment and belonging. Students who reported that more staff greeted them on campus also reported greater interest/enjoyment and a greater sense of belonging. This is crucial, because research shows that students who feel a stronger sense of belonging are more likely to complete their degree, and demonstrate higher achievement in their studies.

As far as downsides go, I do get asked to write an exorbitant number of reference letters, and it can take me a really long time to get anywhere on campus because I keep running into people. Which is funny, because when I was a kid, a trip to the grocery store with my Dad would take hours, because he always ran into someone he knew. I guess the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree…

  • What advice can you give someone who feels awkward or self conscious?

One of the things that makes it scary to talk to a stranger is that you don’t know if they will reject you. But both my personal experience and my research find that rejection is very, very uncommon. I have had lots of nice chats after approaching someone who looked lost and helping them find their way. I’m convinced that both of us have left those interactions with a smile on our face. Know, however, that sometimes people don’t want help – they want to figure things out on their own. Don’t take it personally if someone turns down your offer – just try again with the next person, who will probably be more than happy to accept your help.

 

 

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15 June 2018

Exhibition on the women’s refuge movement

Filed under: Latest news, People pages, What's on — Communications Office @ 2:02 pm
June Freeman

June Freeman

A fascinating new exhibition in Colchester tells the story of the women’s refuge movement in East Anglia and the tenacious grass-roots campaigners who pioneered these vital oases in the struggle for gender equality.

Interviewers recorded the memories of 35 women who fought against the dismissive attitudes of the 1970s and 1980s to lift the lid on domestic violence, helping to establish nine refuges, including those in Ipswich, Chelmsford,  Norwich, and Colchester, between 1974 and 1981.

The free exhibition, “You Can’t Beat a Woman”, runs from 18 to 30 June at The Minories in Colchester. It is accompanied by an illustrated booklet, a workshop and a free talk.

Thanks to a Heritage Lottery Fund grant, Dr June Freeman, an Essex alumna and founder member of Colchester Refuge, spent two years overseeing the oral history project which tells the history of the refuges in the founding women’s own words. June worked with Ravi Thiara, focusing on the campaign to change attitudes to domestic violence in white British and British Asian communities.

Author, researcher and lecturer June explained: “Many of the pioneers of the refuge movement are now in their 60s and 70s, with some in their 80s. If we were to capture the story of the early days of the refuge campaign from the point of view of the women who instigated and were involved in it, we needed to act immediately.”

June adds: “Refuges are now an accepted feature of the social landscape. The dismissive condescension of the 1970s belongs to a bygone age. But, with many refuges heavily dependent on central and local government funding, government policies threaten both the stability and culture of refuges, which were established as organisations run by women for women.”

The challenge for campaigners seeking to establish a refuge was to provide hard evidence of the need for it. Initially Essex’s Social Services department, the police and the local media were unconvinced. A turning point came when the Colchester refuge group liaised with local solicitors to establish how often violence was discussed in their dealings with matrimonial cases.

The group took their story to the press. A 1976 report was headlined “400 wives need refuge from violent husbands”. The article revealed that – in the past year – social workers had dealt with “At least 20 cases of severely beaten women. Two women had broken jaws, two had broken noses, one suffered brain damage, two suffered attempted strangulation and one had 38 stitches in her face.”

The Colchester group also gathered information about women murdered by a husband or partner, uncovering staggering evidence that the criminal justice system was failing to protect them.

In one case, a man tried for strangling his wife was cleared of murder after claiming she was always complaining and had shouted at him with a “vicious look on her face.” Sentencing him for manslaughter, the judge said he had never come across a case where anyone had endured so much provocation and gave him just three years’ probation.

As the campaigning women uncovered more horror stories, a groundswell of public opinion pressurised local councils to find properties they could rent. In the early days these were frequently run-down buildings where the women and their children endured squalid conditions. Campaigners helped to decorate them, appealing for furniture and utensils to try to establish safe, supportive and welcoming accommodation.

Black, Asian and ethnic minority women were a critical part of the struggle for women’s rights and they developed specialist women’s refuges to serve the different needs of their communities. Interviews focusing on British Asian experiences form part of the exhibition, which moves to a gallery in Bethnal Green Road, East London, in January.

‘You Can’t Beat a Woman’ is open from 9am to 5pm from Monday 18 June to Saturday 30 June at The Minories, High Street, Colchester. Admission is free.

A workshop led by Mell Robinson entitled ‘A Woman’s Voice: 100 years of women’s empowerment’ takes place at Firstsite, Colchester from 10am to 4pm on Saturday 23 June. Places are limited and tickets cost £10.50 including lunch.

A free talk by Roxanne Ellis, entitled ‘The Making of the Femicide Census Quilt’ takes place at Firstsite on Monday 25 June from 2-3pm.

For more information, see: www.youcantbeatawoman.co.uk

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4 June 2018

Tribute to Janet Noyes

Filed under: Latest news, People pages — Communications Office @ 5:31 pm
Janet Noyes

Janet Noyes

Janet Noyes first joined the University of Essex in 1964 and soon became busy helping to set up the Department of Electronic Systems Engineering (ESE). In Janet’s case ‘helping’ can be taken to mean ‘leading’ and in 1972 she became the Executive Officer for the Department. Despite her work commitments in the early years she also found time to regularly enjoy playing tennis with a colleague on the courts, that were at that time, by Wivenhoe House.

The first, and subsequent heads of department, relied on Janet and in the early days Janet often made decisions that would now be taken by a head of department. In all Janet led the Department through 12 heads of department.

Janet was efficient, clear and organised. One past student of ESE noted how he and his “feckless fellow students”, were fond of Janet and her efficient way of organising them. Other past students and colleagues, “held her in high esteem”. One current member of the School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering kindly remembered, as a probationary member of staff, how Janet “explained how this place worked to me’. Another Professor remembers how Janet would provide carefully prepared documentation for meetings, including briefing notes highlighting the important matters to be emphasised at the meeting. Janet reflected an earlier, no-nonsense time.

When Janet first joined the University, she lived with her parents and their Boxer dog. After her parents had passed away, Janet’s family became her colleagues, her friends outside work, and her animals. Janet had a love for animals, and on retirement acquired cats, of course in modest numbers, never having more than three. Janet loved her cats, and their personalities. She treated all living things as if they were human, the cats often being chastised for chasing birds in her beloved garden. Janet spent many hours in her garden on retirement and her efforts created a splendid place, admired by her friends. Summer would always involve friends being entertained in the summer house, with Janet delivering tea, and her homemade cake from the house. Her cakes were only one element of her culinary skills. She also regularly made marmalade and her own Christmas cake each year, to complete a pheasant Christmas dinner taken with her cats. All completed in time for the Queen at 3pm.

In her spare time Janet helped, several days a week, at the Hospice Bookshop. She enjoyed the atmosphere there, and it brought her company and closeness to books. In her last few years, health issues kept her close to Frinton. She did, however, find time and energy, to attend the monthly Arts Society lectures in Colchester, always rushing away afterwards to tend to her companion cats.

Janet died on May 1 after slipping into a coma after a stroke. Former Essex colleagues stayed in contact with her and just the day before her death she had been visited by two dear colleagues from ESE. Everyone who knew Janet will remember her with great affection. As a retirement gift her colleagues made her a quilt with every member of the ESE Department contributing to the project as a mark of their appreciation. Janet was a true English lady.

Janet’s funeral took place on Tuesday 5 June 2018.

This tribute to Janet was prepared by her friends and colleagues from the School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering.

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11 May 2018

A new vision for our wellbeing services

Filed under: Latest news, People pages, Student experience — Communications, CER @ 11:16 am

Angela Jones is our Head of Student Support. Here she tells us about the new vision for our wellbeing services.

We have a new vision for our well being services which will mean a better service for our students.

We have a new vision for our well being services which will mean a better service for our students.

What sort of changes are going on in the wellbeing team/service?

Our team is made up of dedicated staff committed to student wellbeing – we are always reflecting on our services and thinking about how we can make them better for our students.  We’ve recognised that changes in society and growth in student numbers mean we need to develop our services. National (and international) research has identified new ways of supporting and promoting wellbeing and we want to be able to implement these innovations. We are therefore reconfiguring our offer – while we will continue to provide or support the services we offer at present, we are proposing to expand into new areas. We want to work proactively with the Students’ Union, Occupational Health and other internal and external partners to support prevention and help our students thrive and get the most out of their time at Essex.  Our new vision is, as part of the Healthy University Sub-strategy, to create a healthy and inclusive community in which every student has the tools to enable them to succeed:

Are these physical moves/changes?

No.  Our service will continue to be provided in Southend, Loughton and Colchester and accessed via the Student Hub is each of these locations.

How will the changes impact on staff/students?

The whole reason behind the changes is to respond to student need and demand.  Feedback via the SU change week has identified a clear desire for more interventions, a wider range of support and more counselling.  Feedback from students with individual needs has identified as need to make our community more inclusive.  Responding to this feedback, our proposed restructure will increase significantly the volume of counselling we can offer as well as create roles dedicated to launching new activities and working with academic colleagues in departments to improve inclusivity and support students.

Is there a period where we will be directed somewhere else for support? For the majority of students no.  Services will continue as normal. If changes may affect individual students eg, for some DSA funded provision,  we will work closely with them to support them through any change.

How will this impact support that students receive?

  • Availability for student counselling at Colchester Campus will increase by 30%
  • By increasing appointments with a wellbeing assessor, we will reduce the waiting time for students to be seen
  • More one to one and groups will be available – tell us what you think would be most useful to prioritise

Why is wellbeing so important?

Physical and mental health is important for all of us.  We all experience periods of feeling great, and times when we are below par.  In order to thrive and get the most out of life, we need to take care of our health.  That is why we are proposing to tackle the issue of wellbeing in a holistic and proactive way- we don’t want to wait until someone is unwell to act – as part of the broader agenda of being a Heathy University, epitomised by our new HUSS, we want to help our students be well, stay well and get well. We can then play a part in making sure every member of our community is given the tools to achieve their full potential.

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